Print Page   |   Contact Us   |   Sign In   |   Register
Community Search
Enhancing Coordination Update
Share |

CCD LC Home l News l Webinars & Events l Resource Library

Communities of Practice l Enhancing Coordination Updates





October 25, 2012

 

Coordinated Chronic Disease Program Leads and Chronic Disease Program Directors:

 

Welcome to the Coordinated Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Program’s (CCDP) weekly update featuring news, tools, and resources that may be useful for your state-based chronic disease prevention and health promotion efforts. 

 

Should you have any questions about the update, please feel free to contact me using the information located at the end of the update.  Enjoy!

 

Features highlighted in this update include:

 

Cross-Cutting Updates:

·         Community Benefit: An Opportunity for Public Health and Hospitals to Work Together

·         A Solution for Connecting Clinical Settings and Community Resources: Electronic Referrals with Feedback for Tobacco Use, Obesity, Diabetes, and Beyond, November 1 (Webinar)

·         What Role Will Safety-Net Providers Have in the New Healthcare System

·         Advancing Primary Care for the Underserved

·         For Many Uninsured Americans, Medicaid Expansion is Critical: States’ Decisions Have Lifesaving Impact

·         US Uninsurance Rate Falls, But 48.6 Million Still Lack Coverage: Affordable Care Act Contributes to Gains

·         Weight Loss Does Not Lower Heart Disease Risk from Type 2 Diabetes

·         Announcing An Interactive Atlas of Diabetes, Obesity, and Physical Inactivity Data

·         New Course Available on Creating Healthy Communities

 

Diabetes:

·         Even Short Bouts of Daily Exercise Could Help Obese Kids Improve Health

·         New Diabetes Self-Management Efforts, November 1 (Webinar)

·         NACDD Diabetes Leadership Initiative Website Goes Live!

 

Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity:

·         Let’s Go to the Park Today: The Role of Parks in Obesity Prevention and Improving the Public’s Health (Attached)

·         National Complete Streets Coalition October News

·         Champions for Healthy Kids Grant

·         Rural Residents More Likely to Be Obese, Study Finds

·         Salad Bars + Healthier School Lunches = More Fruits and Vegetables for Students

·         American Journal of Preventive Medicine Childhood Obesity Challenge

 

School Health:

·         NACDD’s School Health Releases Timely Publication

 

Tobacco:

·         FDA News: Chronic Disease Management Could Help Cigarette Smokers Kick the Habit

·         Journal of the American Medical Association Articles

·         American Journal of Public Health: Featured Tobacco Articles

 

CROSS-CUTTING UPDATES

COMMUNITY BENEFIT: AN OPPORTUNITY FOR PUBLIC HEALTH AND HOSPITALS TO WORK TOGETHER

Recent Changes in Federal Law Have Created an Opportunity for Hospitals, Health Departments, and Community Groups to Forge New Partnerships and Improve Health 
To maintain their tax-exempt status, nonprofit hospitals must provide benefits to the communities they serve. Historically, hospitals’ community benefit activities have focused on providing charity care and other forms of uncompensated care. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) establishes standard requirements for nonprofit hospitals concerning community benefit reporting, community health needs assessments, and strategies to improve the health of the communities they serve. These strategies for population health improvement often bring together key health partners in communities to work together. 

 

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) summarizes recent changes in federal law pertaining to community benefit in a new Health Policy Snapshot briefWhat’s New with Community Benefit?

 

RWJF and the Kresge Foundation have also funded The Hilltop Institute at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), to develop a series of issue briefs to help guide policy-makers, budget officers, hospitals, and other stakeholders around the issue of community benefit, and ensure their community benefit activities are responsive to the most pressing health needs of the people they serve. Two new briefs in this series focus on reporting requirements developed by the Internal Revenue Service, and the role of nonprofit hospitals in addressing environmental and social determinants of health.

 

A SOLUTION FOR CONNECTING CLINICAL SETTINGS AND COMMUNITY RESOURCES: ELECTRONIC REFERRALS WITH FEEDBACK FOR TOBACCO USE, OBESITY, DIABETES, AND BEYOND WEBINAR, NOVEMBER 1, 12:00PM (ET)

One of goals of the ARRA/HITECH Act is to develop capacity in the healthcare delivery system to exchange information and refer patients electronically within and across organizations and to community resources. Information exchanges to meet these goals are developing rapidly across the country, using different technical approaches.

 

This webinar will present a working solution for an electronic referral system that will allow any healthcare provider to refer patients to any community resource--cessation services, opportunities for physical exercise, nutritional advice, diabetes care management and more. Unlike other approaches, this model will automatically add feedback reports from these diverse community settings directly into a patient's medical record.

 

Presenters will describe in laymen's terms what this is, how it works, and what resources are needed to use this approach. A step-by-step illustration will show how the model currently works to exchange real data between a community health center and a tobacco quitline. While a standardized approach works well for the clinical EMR environment, this flexible model is needed to connect to many different community resources.

Presenters

  • Thomas Land, PhD, Director, Office of Statistics and Evaluation, Bureau of Community Health and Prevention, Massachusetts Department of Public Health; and Senior Scientist, Multi-State Collaborative for Health Systems Change
  • Michael Stelmach, MBA, Director, Health Information Technology Projects, John Snow, Inc.
  • Caroline Cranos, Multi-State Collaborative for Health Systems Change, Moderator

 

Registration

Registration is open to all public health, technology and healthcare representatives interested in learning more about electronic information exchange between any clinic or any electronic health record system, especially tobacco cessation and chronic disease.  We anticipate high demand, so please register early to ensure your space. Register Now!

 

WHAT ROLE WILL SAFETY-NET PROVIDERS HAVE IN THE NEW HEALTH CARE SYSTEM

Policymakers are increasingly looking to integrated health care delivery systems, such as accountable care organizations, to care for populations that are vulnerable because of low income, poor health, or complex needs. It’s unclear, however, to what extent safety-net providers like community health centers and public hospitals—which have long experience caring for these patients—will be included in such systems. A new issue brief from The Commonwealth Fund and the National Academy for State Health Policy discusses key design considerations for including safety-net providers in integrated delivery systems, which are able to provide a coordinated continuum of health services for their patients while holding themselves accountable for the outcomes and costs of that care. In the brief, the authors also explore the roles that state and federal agencies can play in supporting and testing models of integrated care delivery.

 

Click here to access the issue brief.

 

Source: K. Witgert and C. Hess, Including Safety-Net Providers in Integrated Delivery Systems: Issues and Options for Policymakers, The Commonwealth Fund and The National Academy for State Health Policy, August 2012

 

ADVANCING PRIMARY CARE FOR THE UNDERSERVED

Smaller medical practices may perform better than others in providing ongoing care and coordination, but are more challenged than larger practices in implementing quality improvement efforts, according to survey results released by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). The survey, conducted by the Center for Health Care Strategies, included 126 primary care practices culled from four of RWJF’s Aligning Forces for Quality communities and two additional states. The chief purpose of the survey was to better understand the capacity of practices serving large numbers of low-income patients to implement advanced primary care models. Additional key insights from the survey include (1) primary care practices excel in providing comprehensive services, being family-centered, and implementing clinical information systems, and (2) the practices struggle to provide expanded access, use care teams effectively, and implement systems for quality measurement and improvement. Click here to view the report.

 

FOR MANY UNINSURED AMERICANS, MEDICAID EXPANSION IS CRITICAL: STATES’ DECISIONS HAVE LIFESAVING IMPACT

Health officials in Washington have been working to revamp and expand the state’s Medicaid program since passage of the Affordable Care Act in 2010. It is a complex undertaking, expected to bring more than 300,000 residents into the coverage fold. Read full story >>

 

US UNINSURANCE RATE FALLS, BUT 48.6 MILLION STILL LACK COVERAGE: AFFORDABLE CARE ACT CONTRIBUTES TO GAINS

While a drop in the number and rate of uninsured Americans is heartening news to public health advocates and indicates success from some provisions of the Affordable Care Act, nearly 49 million people still lack health insurance.
Read full story >>

 

WEIGHT LOSS DOES NOT LOWER HEART DISEASE RISK FROM TYPE 2 DIABETES

Intervention stopped early in NIH-funded study of weight loss in overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes after finding no harm, but no cardiovascular benefits

Access full article

 

An intensive diet and exercise program resulting in weight loss does not reduce cardiovascular events such as heart attack and stroke in people with longstanding type 2 diabetes, according to a study supported by the National Institutes of Health.

 

The Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) study tested whether a lifestyle intervention resulting in weight loss would reduce rates of heart disease, stroke, and cardiovascular-related deaths in overweight and obese people with type 2 diabetes, a group at increased risk for these events.

 

Researchers at 16 centers across the United States worked with 5,145 people, with half randomly assigned to receive an intensive lifestyle intervention and the other half to a general program of diabetes support and education. Both groups received routine medical care from their own health care providers.

 

Although the intervention did not reduce cardiovascular events, Look AHEAD has shown other important health benefits of the lifestyle intervention, including decreasing sleep apnea, reducing the need for diabetes medications, helping to maintain physical mobility <http://www.nih.gov/news/health/mar2012/niddk-28.htm>,  and improving quality of life. Previous Look AHEAD findings are available at <www.lookaheadtrial.org>.

 

"Look AHEAD found that people who are obese and have type 2 diabetes can lose weight and maintain their weight loss with a lifestyle intervention," said Dr. Rena Wing, chair of the Look AHEAD study and professor of psychiatry and human behavior at Brown University. "Although the study found weight loss had many positive health benefits for people with type 2 diabetes, the weight loss did not reduce the number of cardiovascular events."

 

Data are currently being analyzed to fully understand the cardiovascular disease results.  Investigators are preparing a report of the findings for a peer-reviewed publication.

 

Find more information about the Look AHEAD trial (NCT00017953), including a list of current publications, at <www.lookaheadtrial.org>. For a list of centers enrolling patients for diabetes or obesity trials, search for keywords "diabetes" or "obesity" at <www.clinicaltrials.gov>.

 

ANNOUNCING AN INTERACTIVE ATLAS OF DIABETES, OBESITY, AND PHYSICAL INACTIVITY DATA, NOVEMBER 5

CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation and Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity invite you to join us for a webinar to learn how to use this Atlas—our newest resource!

Background: In November 2012, CDC will update its current Web site containing statistics on the incidence and prevalence of diabetes, obesity, and leisure-time physical inactivity (www.cdc.gov/diabetes/statistics) to a new, interactive atlas (www.cdc.gov/diabetes/atlas). In addition to seeing statistical data, in the new atlas you will find maps and motion charts showing visually how the prevalence of these three health problems has changed across years and geographic areas. The atlas will even allow you to plot changes in prevalence and incidence of diabetes relative to changes in obesity rates.

Note: Please join your colleagues in one office, if possible, to open phone lines for other participants.

1:30pm–2:30pm, EDT; 800-369-2096, participant code 30433;

https://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=PW7004707&p=30433&t=c

 

3:00pm–4:00pm, EDT; 800-988-0594, participant code 40063

https://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=PW7004712&p=40063&t=c  

Presenters:

Nilka Rios Burrows, MPH, MT (ASCP)

Epidemiologist

Division of Diabetes Translation

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Karen Kirtland, PhD

Epidemiologist

Division of Diabetes Translation

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Please note: We are limited to the first 50 participants at each time slot. Since diabetes program managers, BRFSS coordinators, and nutrition, physical activity and obesity program managers are all invited, please try to coordinate with your colleagues and only use 1 line per state per time slot, if possible.

After the presentations, the presenters will be taking questions by phone and online. Please listen in at the start of the call for information on how to submit your questions.

 

NEW COURSE AVAILABLE ON CREATING HEALTHY COMMUNITIES 

Developed by a three-part coalition at The Ohio State University (PRC, DOH and College and supporting four PHAB domains, this is a new online, interactive, self-directed course called "Creating Opportunities for Healthy Communities”which will provide basic knowledge about how our social networks, community structures and local and state policies affect our health and health behavior is now available. Read more here.

DIABETES

EVEN SHORT BOUTS OF DAILY EXERCISE COULD HELP OBESE KIDS IMPROVE HEALTH

A recent study offered some encouraging potential ammunition in the fight against rising childhood obesity rates: As little as 20 minutes of daily, vigorous physical activity can reduce diabetes risk and increase fitness. Read full story >>

NEW DIABETES SELF-MANAGEMENT EFFORTS WEBINAR, NOVEMBER 1, 1:00PM-2:30PM

In 2012, the American Diabetes Association, National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Task Force revised the National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support. The new National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support recognized Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) professionals as part of the instructional staff for the Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support teams. This webinar will discuss the new national diabetes self-management standards and community-based diabetes self-management programs and resources.

 

Speakers:

  • Paulina N. Duker, MPH, RN, BC-ADM, CDE; American Diabetes Association
  • Valerie Rochester, MPA; Black Women’s Health Imperative
  • Nicolette Warren, MS, MCHES; Society for Public Health Education

 

Click here to register.

 

NACDD DIABETES LEADERSHIP INITIATIVE WEBSITE GOES LIVE!

A new website for the Diabetes Leadership Initiative (DLI) offers resources and information related to this three-year initiative to address the serious and growing impact of diabetes and its complications. Discover four DLI state projects, white papers and handy links to resources from organizations such as the American Diabetes Association. Visit the DLI website atwww.diabetesleadershipinitiative.com

 

NUTRITION, PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, AND OBESITY

LET’S GO TO THE PARK TODAY: THE ROLE OF PARKS IN OBESITY PREVENTION AND IMPROVING THE PUBLIC’S HEALTH (ATTACHED)

http://online.liebertpub.com/toc/chi/8/5

 

Authors: Heidi M. Blanck, Ph.D.,1 Diana Allen, B.S., MCRP,2 Zarnaaz Bashir, M.P.H.,3 Nina Gordon, M.P.A.,4

Alyson Goodman, M.D., M.P.H.,1,5 Dee Merriam, FASLA,6 and Candace Rutt, Ph.D.1

 

Abstract

Let’s go to the park today! This familiar phrase is heard routinely throughout the year in many U.S. households. Access to parks,

trails, open spaces, and recreational facilities not only provides increased opportunities for children and adults to play and be physically

active, but these venues also influence other behaviors. As the health and wellbeing of our children are impacted by the daily

environment in which they live, learn, and play, the use of parks and other recreation spaces as a healthful venue is important to

consider in a comprehensive view of childhood and family obesity prevention. This article briefly summarizes some of the obesity related

benefits of parks across the local, state, and national park systems and highlights specific initiatives as examples of the commitment

by park agencies to benefit the public’s health and play a role in obesity and chronic disease prevention.

 

NATIONAL COMPLETE STREETS COALITION OCTOBER NEWS

New policies are adopted in Georgia, Michigan, New Jersey, and Wisconsin. Policy action in DC, Florida, Iowa, Massachusetts, South Carolina, Tennessee and Washington. Applications now being accepted for free Complete Streets workshops and more in this month's news from the National Complete Streets Coalition.  Read full newsletter.

 

CHAMPIONS FOR HEALTHY KIDS GRANT

Through the Champions for Healthy Kids program, the General Mills Foundation will award 50 grants of $10,000 to organizations working to improve nutrition and physical fitness behaviors for youth (ages 2-18). SPARK is a model program for this grant and can provide the resources you need to promote physical activity and healthy eating.

 

·         Eligibility: Schools, after school programs, daycares, community-based orgs & government agencies

·         Award Amount: $10,000

·         Deadline: December 3, 2012

 

Next Steps:

1. Click here for more information and to access the grant application.

2. Contact SPARK at 1-800-SPARK PE or spark@sparkpe.org. A Program Consultant will ask you a few questions, learn about your current program, and listen to your vision for improving nutrition and physical fitness behaviors in your program. Together, we'll create a program that will WORK and LAST.

 

RURAL RESIDENTS MORE LIKELY TO BE OBESE, STUDY FINDS 
Underscoring the importance of community-based interventions that target people where they live, a recent study found rural residents are more likely to be obese than city dwellers. Read full story >>

 

SALAD BARS + HEALTHIER SCHOOL LUNCHES = MORE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES FOR STUDENTS

Children eat healthier foods when nutritious options are available.

School children eat more fruits and vegetables when they have a variety of choices, such as those provided in a self-serve salad bar. That’s what research and actual experience in schools are discovering.(1) To accelerate this trend, the "Let’s Move Salad Bars to Schools” program is offering incentives to help school lunch rooms become better equipped to provide tasty fruits and vegetables.

Self-serve salad bars increase students’ consumption of fruits and vegetables in schools and, thanks to new National School Lunch Program (NSLP) standards, the school day is healthier starting this year. The new meal standards include ensuring that the 32 million students participating in the program are offered both fruits and vegetables every school day. Using salad bars is one way for schools to implement the new nutrition standards for school lunch, which more than double the amount of fruits and vegetables served and emphasize color and variety.

The health benefits of fruits and vegetables are many.  As part of a healthy diet, they help contribute to optimal child growth, weight management and chronic disease prevention. Yet across the U.S., fruit and vegetable consumption among adolescents is low.(2) School salad bars and the new NSLP standards are two ways to help improve this problem. When offered multiple fruit and vegetable choices, children may respond by trying new items, incorporating greater variety into their diets, and increasing their daily consumption of fruits and vegetables.(3)

Any school, public or private, participating in the NSLP can apply for a start-up award to help pay for salad bar equipment. And, members of the school community can help raise money for a salad bar by holding fundraising events or applying for small grants.  Interested schools can begin the salad bar application process by completing an online application at:www.saladbars2schools.org. The website also offers details about the benefits of salad bars, and resources to help roll out salad bars in schools.

Let's Move Salad Bars to Schools is an initiative of the Food Family Farming Foundation, National Fruit and Vegetable Alliance, United Fresh Produce Association Foundation, and Whole Foods Market to support First Lady Michelle Obama'sLet's Move! Initiative.

More Information

References

http://saladbars2schools.org/why

MMWR Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Among High School Students —United States, 2010 November 25, 2011 / 60(46);1583-1586

3 Harris DM, Seymour J, Grummer-Strawn L, et al. Let’s Move Salad Bars to Schools: A public-private partnership to increase student fruit and vegetable consumption. Childhood Obesity 2012; 8(4):294 – 297.

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PREVENTIVE MEDICINE CHILDHOOD OBESITY CHALLENGE

The next round of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine Childhood Obesity Challenge has launched!

 

Round 2 seeks submissions focusing on innovative policies aimed at reducing childhood obesity, as well as strategies for getting these policies adopted and applied to schools, institutions, municipalities, or other organizations.

 

The Challenge is open to individuals or teams from any sector, including those who might have submitted in prior AJPM Childhood Obesity Challenge competitions.

 

Submissions will be judged based on innovativeness and potential real-world effectiveness.  The first-place winner will receive a $2,500 cash prize and will be featured in AJPM (website and print). Cash prizes will also go to second- and third-place winners, and the winner of the 'Popular Vote.'

 

The deadline to submit is Nov. 30, with winners to be announced Jan. 15, 2013.

 

Visit the Challenge website http://ajpmchallenge.calit2.net/  for details on Round 2 and to view Round 1's submission gallery.

 

SCHOOL HEALTH

NACDD’S SCHOOL HEALTH RELEASES TIMELY PUBLICATION

Building and Sustaining School Health Programs in State Health Agencies without Dedicated Funding

 

Discover how to think outside the box when it comes to school health programs that face decreased funding. This publication shares successful state initiatives that are ripe for replication. You can download this report and others here.

TOBACCO

FDA NEWS: CHRONIC DISEASE MANAGEMENT COULD HELP CIGARETTE SMOKERS KICK THE HABIT

Access full article

RedOrbit, October 18, 2012

 

Smoking rates among several target age groups have been in decline in the US. A new study of existing smokers focuses on their attempts at quitting and shows why there is a high likelihood those attempts will have been unsuccessful. Though there are several options available to smokers for cessation and ultimately for quitting outright, most smokers become frustrated and give up on quitting.

 

Nancy Rigotti, MD, director of the Tobacco Research and Treatment Center of the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Department of Medicine has outlined the current available resources and recommends strategies that can help smokers who are struggling to quit. Her report, in the Oct 17 issue of JAMA, details her findings.

 

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION ARTICLES

·         Strategies to Help a Smoker Who Is Struggling to Quit by Nancy Rigotti.

·         How Clinicians Can Help Smokers to Quit by Steven Schroeder.

 

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH: FEATURED TOBACCO ARTICLES

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Deaths From Secondhand Smoke Exposure in the United States: Economic Implications 

Wendy Max, Hai-Yen Sung, and Yanling Shi

American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 102, No. 11: 2173-2180.

http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2012.300805?ai=s0&ui=bav&af=T

 

Mapping Tobacco Quitlines in North America: Signaling Pathways to Improve Treatment

Scott J. Leischow, Keith Provan, Jonathan Beagles, Joseph Bonito, Erin Ruppel, Gregg Moor, and Jessie Saul

American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 102, No. 11: 2123-2128.

http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2011.300529?ai=s0&ui=bav&af=T

 

A Transnational Study of Migration and Smoking Behavior in the Mexican-Origin Population

Elisa Tong, Naomi Saito, Daniel J. Tancredi, Guilherme Borges, Richard L. Kravitz, Ladson Hinton, Sergio Aguilar-Gaxiola,

Maria Elena Medina-Mora, and Joshua Breslau

American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 102, No. 11: 2116-2122.

http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2012.300739?ai=s0&ui=bav&af=T

  

Self-Help Booklets for Preventing Postpartum Smoking Relapse: A Randomized Trial

Thomas H. Brandon, Vani Nath Simmons, Cathy D. Meade, Gwendolyn P. Quinn,

Elena N. Lopez Khoury, Steven K. Sutton, and Ji-Hyun Lee

American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 102, No. 11: 2109-2115.

http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2012.300653?ai=s0&ui=bav&af=T

  

Young Adults’ Favorable Perceptions of Snus, Dissolvable Tobacco Products, and Electronic Cigarettes: Findings From a Focus Group Study

Kelvin Choi, Lindsey Fabian, Neli Mottey, Amanda Corbett, and Jean Forster

American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 102, No. 11: 2088-2093.

http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2011.300525?ai=s0&ui=bav&af=T

 

Accuracy and Importance of Projections From a Dynamic Simulation Model of Smoking Prevalence in the United States

Kenneth E. Warner and David Méndez

American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 102, No. 11: 2045-2048.

http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2012.300771?ai=s0&ui=bav&af=T

 

Measuring Indoor Air Quality of Hookah Lounges

Steven C. Fiala, Daniel S. Morris, and Rebecca L. Pawlak

American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 102, No. 11: 2043-2045.

http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2012.300751?ai=s0&ui=bav&af=T

 

Up in Smoke: Vanishing Evidence of Tobacco Disparities in the Institute of Medicine’s Report on Sexual and Gender Minority Health

Joseph G. L. Lee, John R. Blosnich, and Cathy L. Melvin

American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 102, No. 11: 2041-2043.

http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2012.300746?ai=s0&ui=bav&af=T

 

Type A Behavior Pattern and Coronary Heart Disease: Philip Morris’s "Crown Jewel”

Mark P. Petticrew, Kelley Lee, and Martin McKee

American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 102, No. 11: 2018-2025.

http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2012.300816?ai=s0&ui=bav&af=T

                      

Ethical Concerns in Tobacco Control Nonsmoker and "Nonnicotine” Hiring Policies: The Implications of Employment Restrictions for Tobacco Control

Kristin Voigt

American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 102, No. 11: 2013-2018.

http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2012.300745?ai=s0&ui=bav&af=T

 

A Ban on Menthol Cigarettes: Impact on Public Opinion and Smokers' Intention to Quit

Jennifer L. Pearson, David B. Abrams, Raymond S. Niaura, Amanda Richardson, and Donna M. Vallone

American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 102, No. 11: e107-e114.

http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2012.300804?ai=s0&ui=bav&af=T

 

Current Tobacco Use Among Adults in the United States: Findings From the National Adult Tobacco Survey

Brian A. King, Shanta R. Dube, and Michael A. Tynan

American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 102, No. 11: e93-e100.

http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2012.301002?ai=s0&ui=bav&af=T