Print Page   |   Contact Us   |   Sign In   |   Register
Community Search
Enhancing Coordination Update
Share |

CCD LC Home l News l Webinars & Events l Resource Library

Communities of Practice l Enhancing Coordination Updates





February 8, 2013

 

 

 

Coordinated Chronic Disease Program Leads and Chronic Disease Program Directors:

Welcome to the Coordinated Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Program’s (CCDP) weekly update featuring news, tools, and resources that may be useful for your state-based chronic disease prevention and health promotion efforts. 

 

Should you have any questions about the update, please feel free to contact Branalyn Williams, bkwilliams@cdc.gov.

 

Features highlighted in this update include:

 

Cross-Cutting Updates:

  • Major Causes of Disability, Death Shift Around the Globe: Chronic Diseases Now Taking the Lead
  • The Affordable Care Act: What Is In Store for US Consumers: Changes Planned
  • Improving the Screening, Prevention, and Management of Hypertension – An Implementation Tool for Clinic Practice Teams
  • Health Information Technology Evaluation Tool
  • HHS Awards $1.5 Billion to Support States Building Health Insurance Marketplaces
  • Did You Know?
  • Injury Prevention: How the Built Environment Impacts the Safety of Communities

 

Diabetes:

  • Information You Can Use Newsletter: January/February Edition (Attached)

Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity:

  • USDA Aims for Healthier Snacks and Drinks in Schools
  • Federal Food Service Guidelines with Dr. Joel Kimmons, February 8 (webinar)

 

School Health:

  • HHS Announces New Investment in School-Based Health Centers

Tobacco:

  • Vital Signs: Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults Aged > 18 Years with Mental Illness, United States 2009-2011
  • Truth 2.0 Webinar, February 20th
  • Call for Nominations: Unsung Heroes in Tobacco Control Award
  • Request for Applications (RFA): Targeted Capacity Expansion Peer-to-Peer
  • Proposed Rule: Smokeless Tobacco Product Warning Statements; Request for Comments and Scientific Evidence

 

CROSS-CUTTING UPDATES

MAJOR CAUSES OF DISABILITY, DEATH SHIFT AROUND THE GLOBE: CHRONIC DISEASES NOW TAKING THE LEAD

The main causes of death and disability around the globe have undergone a major shift, with chronic diseases now leading the way, according to a significant new study.

 

The Global Burden of Disease Study — published as an issue of The Lancet in December — is the result of decades of work to understand the leading causes of death and disability across the globe. The study found that chronic conditions such as heart disease and diabetes are in large part outpacing traditional public health targets such as malnutrition and childhood infectious diseases. Read full story >>

THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT: WHAT IS IN STORE FOR US CONSUMERS: CHANGES PLANNED

When the Affordable Care Act passed in 2010, provisions set to go in effect four years later seemed far off. But with 2014 not so far off — and the law now seemingly here to stay — Americans are wondering how reforms will affect them. Read full story >>

IMPROVING THE SCREENING, PREVENTION, AND MANAGEMENT OF HYPERTENSION – AN IMPLEMENTATION TOOL FOR CLINIC PRACTICE TEAMS

This 130-page publication, developed by the Washington State Department of Health, is for health care professionals and specifically clinic practice teams. It is meant to serve as a quality improvement guide and a compilation of resources to support practices in their efforts to improve blood pressure control. Click here to access a copy of the tool.

HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION TOOLKIT

With the large investments required for health information technology (IT) projects, stakeholders are increasingly demanding to know what the actual value of these projects has been, or will be. Evaluations allow us to determine whether or not what one has set out to accomplish has been accomplished, and to help us to understand what has worked in a given project and what has not. Lessons that emerge from evaluations help to guide both your team, as well as others, in their approach to projects in the future.

 

Evaluations must therefore be an integral part of any health IT project. The U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) National Resource Center for Health IT developed the Health IT Evaluation Toolkit to help project teams think through the process of developing an evaluation plan of their project. Section I outlines a step by step process for a team to determine what the goals of a given project are, what is important to their stakeholders, what needs to be measured to satisfy those stakeholders, what is truly feasible to measure, and how to measure those items. Section II includes a list of measures that are often employed in health IT projects. Each of the provided tables includes a list of possible measures, suggestions on data sources that can be leveraged for each measure, cost considerations, potential pitfalls and general notes. Section III contains some examples of a variety of implementation projects. Click here to access a copy of the toolkit.

HHS AWARDS $1.5 BILLION TO SUPPORT STATES BUILDING HEALTH INSURANCE MARKETPLACES

Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius recently announced $1.5 billion in new Exchange Establishment Grants to California, Delaware, Iowa, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, and Vermont to ensure these states have the resources necessary to build a marketplace that meets the needs of their residents. "These states are working to implement the health care law and we continue to support them as they build new affordable insurance marketplaces,” Secretary Sebelius said. "Starting in 2014, Americans in all states will have access to quality, affordable health insurance and these grants are helping to make that a reality.”

 

Because of the Affordable Care Act, consumers and small businesses will have access to marketplaces starting in 2014. The marketplaces are one-stop shops that will provide access to quality, affordable private health insurance choices similar to those offered to members of Congress. Consumers in every state will be able to buy insurance from qualified health plans directly through these marketplaces and may be eligible for tax credits to help pay for their health insurance. These marketplaces promote competition among insurance providers and offer consumers more choices.

 

Delaware, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, North Carolina, and Vermont received awards today for Level One Exchange Establishment Grants, which are one-year grants states will use to build marketplaces. California, Kentucky, Massachusetts, New York, and Oregon received Level Two Exchange Establishment Grants today. Level Two grants are multi-year awards to states to further develop their marketplaces.

 

A total of 49 states, the District of Columbia, and four territories have received grants to plan their marketplaces, and 34 states and the District of Columbia have received grants to build their marketplaces. To ensure states have the support and time they need to build a marketplace, states may apply for grants through the end of 2014 and may use funds through their start-up year.

 

Click here for a detailed breakdown of marketplace grant awards made to states, including summaries of how states plan on using the awards. Click here for more information on the Health Insurance Marketplace.

 

DID YOU KNOW?

"Did You Know?” is a weekly feature from the Office for State, Tribal, Local and Territorial Support to inform your prevention activities. We invite you to read, share, and take action!

 

  • Epi Info is a free tool used worldwide by public health professionals to collect, visualize, analyze, and present public health data.
  • More than 181 countries use Epi Info, covering all continents including Antarctica; it has also been translated into more than 13 languages.
  •  Training resources for Epi Info include tutorials, a user guide, videos, and instructions on how to create the new Epi Info Web Survey.

 

INJURY PREVENTION: HOW THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT IMPACTS THE SAFETY OF COMMUNITIES

Special feature by APHA 2012 intern, Nicholas Shaffer

The built environment can be constructed to help prevent injuries. In fact, injury prevention strategies that decrease risk through better design of the built environment are among the most successful interventions and can last years. The built environment can also be used to prevent violence. Built environment features that increase "eyes on the street" (e.g., outside lighting, neighborhoods with frequent pedestrian activity) may help decrease crime. The built environment should be designed with health effects and injury prevention in mind. In the US, 40 percent of pedestrian fatalities occur where there was no crosswalk nearby. 10 percent of fatalities occur inside a crosswalk. The pedestrian fatality rate is 2.91 per 100,000 persons in counties where more than 20 percent of households have incomes below the poverty line (national average is 1.6 deaths per 100,000 persons).

 

There are many ways that the built environment can prevent injury and violence. Improved lighting has been shown to reduce nighttime pedestrian fatalities at crossings by 78 percent. When protected bike lanes are installed in New York City, injury crashes for all road users (drivers, pedestrians and cyclists) typically drop by 40 percent and by more than 50 percent in some locations. Increased walking, cycling and public transit travel tends to reduce crime rates by providing increased monitoring of city streets and transit waiting areas.

 

One example of successful improvements to the built environment comes from California. Boyle Heights is a predominantly Latino community that lacked adequate space to exercise. The residents of Boyle Heights were able to transform a cracked and broken sidewalk into a 1.5 mile rubberized jogging path. Since the completion of the path, daily use has increased from about 200 to more than 1,000 people.

In Florida, the design in the downtown and waterfront areas of Fort Pierce created an unsafe pedestrian environment and attracted crime. To address these issues, the city of Fort Pierce built a roundabout at the gateway between the downtown and waterfront areas, which serves as a traffic-calming device. Extending from the roundabout is a newly constructed connected system of streets. These new streets are built with curb extensions, median refuge islands and clearly marked crosswalks, making pedestrian crossing safer. With the new infrastructure additions, pedestrian activity has increased.

In 2006, the Phoenix Department of Street Transportation began constructing a pedestrian underpass that would bypass a six-lane street, where three pedestrians had been killed in the past 10 years. The underpass has security lighting, a skylight and a wide, unobstructed environment that helps promote security. Improvements made to the surrounding intersections also helped increase pedestrian and bicycling safety. The city built enlarged pedestrian and bike refuge areas, new directional ramps at corners and way-finding markers at intersections and pedestrian countdown indicators on traffic signals. For more information about designing healthy environments, see CDC’s fact sheet on the topic and APHA’s reports and fact sheets.

DIABETES

INFORMATION YOU CAN USE NEWSLETTER: JANUARY & FEBRUARY EDITION (ATTACHED)

"Information You Can Use” (IYCU), is a newsletter that provides information on diabetes and related cross-cutting issues, including updates on programs and initiatives at CDC,  journal articles, resource materials, highlights of successful state programs, continuing education, and much more!

NUTRITION, PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, AND OBESITY

USDA AIMS FOR HEALTHIER SNACKS AND DRINKS IN SCHOOLS

On Friday, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) proposed updated nutrition standards for school snack foods and beverages. The first update since 1979, the proposed standards aim to help schools provide healthier fare in vending machines, cafeteria à la carte lines, and other places where foods and beverages are offered outside of the school meals program.

 

Currently, many of the snack foods and beverages sold in schools are high in calories, fat, and sugar and offer few nutrients. Notably, the proposed standards call for schools to offer more snacks with whole grains, low-fat dairy, fruits, or vegetables as their main ingredient. If implemented, the proposed standards would improve the nutritional quality of the snacks and beverages available to tens of millions of students before, during, and after the school day. USDA will seek public comment on the proposal for 60 days.

 

The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 directed USDA to update the standards for all foods and beverages sold in schools throughout the school campus during the school day. USDA finalized regulations for school meals in January 2012.

FEDERAL FOOD SERVICE GUIDELINES WITH DR. JOEL KIMMONS, FEBRUARY 8, 12:00PM (ET)

A panel discussion including representatives from CDC, DOD, National Association of Blind Merchants and Center for Science in the Public Interest

 

Joel Kimmons is a nutrition scientist and epidemiologist in Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He conducts dietary surveillance and chronic disease research and focuses on policy and environmental changes to increase fruit and vegetable consumption. He represents CDC on the Federal Dietary Reference Intakes Steering Committee, the Federal Working Group on Dietary Supplements, and the Farmers Market Consortium. Guided by sustainable food system approaches to idealizing dietary patterns, including the influences of agricultural, the environment, and gastronomy, he led the creation of Health and Sustainability Guidelines for Federal Concessions and Vending Operations. Joel received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Davis in Nutrition with an emphasis on epidemiology, international nutrition issues, and infant feeding. He grew up on an organic farm and continues to have close ties with farmers and the land.

 

Register: http://hplive.org/events/cdc_food_service_guidelines_with_joel_kimmons/

SCHOOL HEALTH

HHS ANNOUNCES NEW INVESTMENT IN SCHOOL-BASED HEALTH CENTERS

HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius recently announced awards of more than $80 million to 197 school-based health center programs across the country, made possible by the Affordable Care Act. This funding will allow school-based health centers to serve an additional 384,000 students, and continue the expansion of preventive and primary health care services. "These new investments will help school-based health centers establish new sites or upgrade their current facilities to keep our children healthy,” said Secretary Sebelius.

 

School-based health centers enable children with acute or chronic illnesses to attend school and improve the overall health and wellness of all children through health screenings, health promotion and disease prevention activities.

Typically, a school-based clinic provides a combination of primary care, mental health care, substance abuse counseling, case management, dental health, nutrition education, health education and health promotion activities.

 

"Healthy children are more productive children,” said Health Resources and Services Administrator Mary K. Wakefield, Ph.D., R.N. "These grants will improve access to care for children, and help maximize their potential to learn.”

 

The Affordable Care Act provides $200 million in funding from fiscal years 2010 – 2013 for the School-Based Health Center Capital Program (SBHCCP). These grants are the third in the series of awards that is made available to school-based health centers under the Affordable Care Act. Click here for a full list of awards.

 

TOBACCO

VITAL SIGNS: CURRENT CIGARETTE SMOKING AMONG ADULTS AGED≥18 YEARS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS, UNITED STATES, 2009-2011

Despite overall declines in cigarette smoking in the United States, a high prevalence of smoking persists among certain subpopulations, including persons with mental illness. Combined data from the 2009–2011 National Survey on Drug Use and Health were analyzed to calculate state and national estimates of cigarette smoking among adults aged ≥18 years who had any mental illness in the past 12 months. This report summarizes the findings. Read full text.

 

TRUTH 2.0 WEBINAR, FEBRUARY 20, 3:00PM (ET)

Legacy will host a webinar on how the truth® campaign is transforming to spread its message about tobacco use and tobacco industry marketing tactics. Hear how truth is navigating the new media landscape and finding fresh venues to reach a new generation of teens where they live, study and play. This will be a reprise of Legacy’s November 19th webinar. Click here to register.

 

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS: UNSUNG HEROES IN TOBACCO CONTROL AWARD

Nomination deadline: March 8, 2013

The American Lung Association and Koop Foundation, Inc. are requesting nominations for the Unsung Heroes’ Award. This annual award celebrates the unsung heroes that make a tobacco-free future possible. In the fight against the tobacco industry, it is important to recognize people who fight daily to prevent kids from smoking and help smokers quit. Every time a smoker quits or a child decides not to pick up a cigarette, it is a victory in this fight. Please recognize friends and colleagues who make a difference in the tobacco control community by nominating them for this award.  Click here to read more about this award and instructions on how to submit nominations. Please contact Jennifer Singleterry at Jennifer.singleterry@lung.org with any questions.

 

REQUEST FOR APPLICATIONS (RFA): TARGETED CAPACITY EXPANSION PEER-TO-PEER (TCE-PTP)

Application deadline: March 15, 2013

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has announced a Request for Applications (RFA) with the purpose of expanding and enhancing service capacity through the provision of addiction peer recovery support services for those individuals with substance use disorders. The funding opportunity is open to state and local governments; federally recognized American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) tribes and tribal organizations; urban Indian organizations; public or private universities and colleges; and community- and faith-based organizations. Click here to view or download the RFA, # TI-13-001. See page 7 of the PDF for language about the goal of reducing tobacco use among individuals receiving direct services under the grant.

 

PROPOSED RULE: SMOKELESS TOBACCO PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS; REQUEST FOR COMMENTS AND SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE

Deadline for comments: April 1, 2013

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a public docket to obtain comments, supported by scientific evidence, regarding what changes to the smokeless tobacco product warnings would promote greater public understanding of the risks associated with the use of smokeless tobacco products. Click here to view the proposed rule and request for comments in the Federal Register, or click here to submit a comment to the FDA on Docket No. FDA-2012-N-1032.