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May 3, 2013

 

 

Coordinated Chronic Disease Program Leads and Chronic Disease Directors:

 

Welcome to the Coordinated Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (CCDP) weekly update featuring news, tools, and resources that may be useful for your state-based chronic disease prevention and health promotion efforts. 

 

Should you have any questions about the update, please feel free to contact Branalyn Williams, bkwilliams@cdc.gov.

 

Features highlighted in this update include:

 

Cross-Cutting Updates:

·        Preventing Chronic Disease: Multiple Chronic Conditions Collection

·        A Review and Analysis of Economic Models of Prevention Benefits

 

Heart Disease & Stroke:

·        NIH Awards $40 Million in Grants to Reduce Stroke Disparities in the U.S.

·        New Publication: AHA Guide for Improving Cardiovascular Health at the Community Level, 2013 Update

 

Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity:

·        It’s Only Natural Campaign Launch from HHS

·        USDA’s Economic Research Service: Food Choices & Health

·        Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: Examining the Evidence to Define Benefit Adequacy

·        Consumption of Added Sugars Among U.S. Adults, 2005-2010

·        USDA Grants: Expanded Eligibility to Improve Access to Fresh, Healthy Food

·        Michigan State University Center for Regional Food Systems and the Union of Concerned Scientists, Economic Analysis of Local and Regional Food Systems, May 20 (Webinar)

 

School Health:

·        RWJF Active Living Research Briefs: Getting Children Physically Active in Schools

 

Tobacco:

·        APHA’s The Nation’s Health: Smokers with Broken Bones Heal Less Quickly, Study Says

 

CROSS-CUTTING UPDATES

PREVENTING CHRONIC DISEASE: MULTIPLE CHRONIC CONDITIONS COLLECTION

This week Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD) released 8 articles focusing on multiple chronic conditions. The articles within this collection address the current trends in population growth, age distribution, and disease dynamics that forecast rises in the prevalence of chronic diseases, other chronic conditions, and combinations of chronic conditions.  Read the full collection online at www.cdc.gov/pcd.

 

Collection Topics Include:

  • Defining and Measuring Chronic Conditions: Imperatives for Research, Policy, Program, and Practice
  • Prevalence of Multiple Chronic Conditions Among US Adults: Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, 2010
  • Health Care Expenditures for Adults With Multiple Treated Chronic Conditions: Estimates From the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 2009
  • Multiple Chronic Conditions Among US Adults Who Visited Physician Offices: Data From the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2009
  • Hospital Utilization, Costs, and Mortality for Adults With Multiple Chronic Conditions, Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 2009
  • Prevalence of Multiple Chronic Conditions Among Medicare Beneficiaries, United States, 2010
  • The Dimensions of Multiple Chronic Conditions: Where Do We Go From Here?
  • Co-Occurrence of Leading Lifestyle-Related Chronic Conditions Among Adults in the United States, 2002-2009

 

A REVIEW AND ANALYSIS OF ECONOMIC MODELS OF PREVENTION BENEFITS

A report titled A Review and Analysis of Economic Models of Prevention Benefits report has been prepared by NORC at the University of Chicago, under contract to the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE). The growth in both the prevalence and spending on chronic diseases in the U.S. population has trigged an increased appreciation of the potential for preventive services as important strategies to delay or avoid the development of harmful and costly conditions. This report reviews a broad variety of approaches to estimating the health and economic impacts of preventive health services, prevention programs, and policy interventions, and considers their usefulness to public and private sector decision makers.

 

HEART DISEASE & STROKE

NEW PUBLICATION: AHA GUIDE FOR IMPROVING CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH AT THE COMMUNITY LEVEL, 2013 UPDATE

The guide provides a comprehensive inventory of evidence-based goals, strategies, and recommendations for cardiovascular disease and stroke prevention that can be implemented on a community level. Includes strategies for addressing behaviors such as smoking, physical inactivity and unhealthy eating habits. Click here to access the guide and related materials.

 

NIH AWARDS $40 MILLION IN GRANTS TO REDUCE STROKE DISPARITIES IN THE U.S.

May is National Stroke Awareness Month

 

Four research centers will develop high-impact culturally tailored interventions aimed at lowering stroke risk among racial and ethnic minorities in the United States. Together the centers are expected to receive $40 million in funding over five years, contingent on the availability of funds from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health.

 

Compared to non-Hispanic whites, racial and ethnic minorities such as African-Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, Asian-Americans, and American Indians and Alaska Natives are more likely to experience a stroke and its related disability.

 

"Much of the disparity in stroke risk in the United States is due to the higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors such as elevated blood pressure among racial and ethnic minorities. A few of the grantees are working closely with at-risk populations to develop interventions that give people tools to achieve blood pressure control," said Walter J. Koroshetz, M.D., deputy director, NINDS. "These research efforts will give us the traction we need to control the greatest modifiable stroke risk factor. Together, the Stroke Prevention /Intervention Research Programs represent a much needed effort to address stroke disparities in the United States."

 

"Each program addresses disparity from a different perspective," said Salina P. Waddy, M.D., program director at NINDS. "One will address uncontrolled blood pressure and be delivered in an individual's home. Others will test community-based strategies to improve diet and exercise behaviors. Still others will bring into focus trends at the health care system and hospital levels."

 

These programs will serve to reduce disparities and make progress toward the stroke objectives and targets outlined in Healthy People 2020, the nation's disease prevention and health promotion goals, she said.

 

To read the full release and learn about the four awardees and their program goals, visit, <http://www.nih.gov/news/health/may2013/ninds-01.htm>.

 

May is National Stroke Awareness month. For more information, go to <http://www.facebook.com/KnowStroke>. 

 

NUTRITION, PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, AND OBESITY

IT’S ONLY NATURAL CAMPAIGN LAUNCH FROM HHS

On Monday, April 15, Surgeon General Regina M. Benjamin announced the launch of It's Only Natural, a new public education campaign that aims to raise awareness among African American women of the importance of and benefits associated with breastfeeding and provide helpful tips.

It’s Only Natural was developed to equip new moms with practical information and emotional support from peers, as well as tips and education about the benefits of breastfeeding and how to make it work in their own lives. The materials were specifically designed to reflect the experience of African American moms, and include:

  • video testimonials from new moms talking about the challenges they have overcome, providing breastfeeding tips, sharing their individual stories, and much more;
  • articles on a variety of topics ranging from laws supporting breastfeeding to how to fit breastfeeding into your daily life;
  • two fact sheets, which contain proper holding and latching techniques, as well as information on managing discomfort and how much milk is enough; and
  • radio public service announcements.

To learn more about the campaign, visit www.womenshealth.gov/ItsOnlyNatural.

 

USDA GRANTS: EXPANDED ELIGIBILITY TO IMPROVE ACCESS TO FRESH, HEALTHY FOOD 

Agriculture Undersecretary Kevin Concannon today expanded eligibility for USDA grants to improve access to fresh produce and healthy foods by Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients at America’s farmers’ markets.

 

As a result of funding provided by Congress through the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act of 2012, USDA last year announced the availability of $4 million in funding to expand the availability of wireless point-of-sale equipment in farmers markets not currently accepting SNAP benefits. Today’s action expands eligibility for grant funds to include direct marketing farmers, as well as farmers markets. Funds may be used to purchase or lease equipment or pay for wireless access. Funds are available to States through September 30, 2013. 

 

"These grants increase the availability of fresh fruits and vegetables to SNAP customers and further encourage them to purchase and prepare healthy foods for their families using SNAP benefits,” said Concannon. "In general, research shows that about 20 cents of every SNAP dollar spent on food ends up in the pocket of American farmers. Installing wireless technology at farmers markets expands the customer base for markets and increases the share of the SNAP dollar that goes directly back to local farmers and into local economies.”

 

USDA has made expanding SNAP recipients’ access to fresh fruits and vegetables through farmers markets a priority in recent years. In 2008, about 750 farmers markets and direct marketing farmers accepted SNAP. In 2012, over 3,200 participated – a four-fold increase in markets, which was accompanied by a six-fold increase in redemptions at these outlets.

 

Along with other criteria, a farmers market is defined as a multi-stall market at which farmer-producers sell agricultural products, particularly fresh fruits and vegetables (but also meat products, dairy products, and/or grains), directly to the general public at a central or fixed location. Direct marketing farmers are individual producers of agricultural products. In order to qualify for the funding announced today, the direct marketing farmer must sell products at a market stall within a farmers market that is not currently participating in SNAP.

 

Research shows that many farmers markets and direct marketing farmers value their ability to accept SNAP as a means to attract a wider customer base and increase sales.  At the same time, a significant number cited the cost of electronic benefit transfer (EBT) equipment as a barrier to accepting SNAP. These findings and others are part of USDA’s Nutrition Assistance at Farmers Markets: Understanding Current Operations report released last week.  Today’s announcement helps to address this barrier by supporting farmers markets and direct marketing farmers in obtaining and operating EBT technology.

 

To find out more about available farmers market equipment funding or to learn more about accepting SNAP benefits at your farmers market, contact your SNAP State agency or visit http://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/ebt/fm.htm.

 

USDA's Food and Nutrition Service oversees the administration of 15 nutrition assistance programs, including SNAP, that touch the lives of one in four Americans over the course of a year.  These programs work together to form a national safety net against hunger. Visit www.fns.usda.gov for information about FNS and nutrition assistance programs.

 

CONSUMPTION OF ADDED SUGARS AMONG U.S. ADULTS, 2005-2010

Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2005–2010

Increased consumption of added sugars, which are sweeteners added to processed and prepared foods, has been linked to a decrease in intake of essential micronutrients (1,2) and an increase in body weight (3). The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010 recommends limiting total intake of discretionary calories, including both added sugars and solid fats, to 5%–15% per day (4). Recent analyses indicate that children and adolescents obtain approximately 16% of their total caloric intake from added sugars (5). This data brief presents results for consumption of added sugars among U.S. adults for 2005–2010. Results are presented by sex, age, race and ethnicity, income, type of food consumed (food or beverage), and location of consumption.

Key Findings:

·        The mean percentage of total calories from added sugars decreased with increasing age and increasing income.

·        Non-Hispanic black men and women consumed a larger percentage of their total calories from added sugars than non-Hispanic white and Mexican-American men and women.

·        More of the calories from added sugars came from foods rather than beverages.

·        More of the calories from added sugars were consumed at home rather than away from home.

 

Read more at: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db122.htm 

 

SUPPLEMENTAL NUTRITION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM: EXAMINING THE EVIDENCE TO DEFINE BENEFIT ADEQUACY

For many Americans who live at or below the poverty threshold, access to healthy foods at a reasonable price is a challenge that often places a strain on already limited resources and may compel them to make food choices that... [read more]

 

USDA’s ECONOMIC RESEARCH SERVICE: FOOD CHOICES & HEALTH

Food Price Outlook

The Consumer Price Index (CPI) for food is probably the most widely used indicator of changes in retail food prices. ERS regularly updates food price forecasts for the short-term period.

 

SNAP Policy Database

A new database--the SNAP Policy Database--provides a central data source for information on State-level program policies in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).

 

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Participation Leads to Modest Changes in Diet Quality

ERS examined survey data to determine if the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) changes the diet quality of program participants, and to compare the diet quality of low-income adult participants and nonparticipants in SNAP.

 

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR REGIONAL FOOD SYSTEMS AND THE UNION OF CONCERNED SCIENTISTS, ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF LOCAL AND REGIONAL FOOD SYSTEMS: TAKING STOCK AND LOOKING AHEAD, MAY 20, 3:00PM (ET) 

To address the current state and future direction of economic analysis with regard to local and regional food systems, Michigan State University’s Center for Regional Food Systems and the Union of Concerned Scientists’ Food & Environment Program convened a meeting of a group of economists and local food researchers on January 31 and February 1, 2013.   This webinar will provide a brief synopsis of the meeting outcomes, with a focus on questions one should consider when conducting or commissioning a study on the economic impacts of local and regional food systems.   There will be adequate opportunity for participants to weigh in with comments and questions to continue to inform the discussion on future economic impact studies of local and regional food commerce.

 

To access the webinar, go to: https://connect.msu.edu/richpirog

 

If you have never attended an Adobe Connect webinar meeting before, please test your connection in advance by going to the link below. You may need to download a small, harmless plug-in and update your version of flash player. https://connect.msu.edu/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm

 

The webinar will be recorded for those who are not able to participate on May 20th.  For additional information please contact:

·        Rich Pirog – Michigan State University Center for Regional Food Systems  - rspirog@msu.edu

·        Jeff O'Hara – Union of Concerned Scientists - johara@ucsusa.org

 

SCHOOL HEALTH

RWJF ACTIVE LIVING RESEARCH BRIEFS: GETTING CHILDREN PHYSICALLY ACTIVE IN SCHOOLS 

Most children don’t get enough physical activity, but schools present many opportunities to get kids moving. Two new research briefs from Active Living Research provide more information on getting children physically active in schools—one looks at physical activity breaks in classrooms, and one at recess. Please feel free to share with your networks!

 

Do Short Physical Activity Breaks in Classrooms Work?

Programs that provide classroom physical activity breaks can increase physical activity, and improve on-task behavior as well as some measures of health. There are a variety of programs that can be used to help kids be active in as little as 10-15 minutes.

 

Increasing Physical Activity through Recess

Providing recess during the school day is an effective and efficient way to increase physical activity and improve academic performance among children. Recess is important because it can help kids get up to 40 percent of their total daily physical activity.

 

Learn more about how schools can help children and teens be active.

 

TOBACCO

APHA’S THE NATION’S HEALTH: SMOKERS WITH BROKEN BONES HEAL LESS QUICKLY, STUDY SAYS

A regular smoker with a broken leg bone should not be surprised to be on crutches a month longer than a nonsmoker with the same injury, according to a recent study. Read full story.

 

 

 

Branalyn K. Williams, MPH

Coordinated State Support Branch

Division of Population Health

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
4770 Buford Hwy, NE, Mail Stop K-93
Atlanta, GA 30341
Email: bkwilliams@cdc.gov
Phone: 770.488.5085
Fax: 770.488.8488
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